Prolotherapy for Myofasciitis

Marc Darrow, MDMarc Darrow, MD

Marc Darrow, M.D., explains Prolotherapy for Myofasciitis.

Myofasciitis is a general term used to describe pain or other dysfunctions in the network of muscles, tendons, and ligaments and other soft connective tissue that holds our bodies together. Myofascial pain may start abruptly or gradually. Abrupt onset is usually the result of trauma to the muscle, such as a sudden overload or over-extension, while a gradual onset is due to chronic overload, virus, or other disease, or psychogenic stress.

Although an understanding of the various symptoms of pain, such as whether it occurs at rest or during activity, what muscles it is related to, whether it is primary or referred, and countless other factors, the doctor can isolate the problem and treat it with trigger point injections or with Prolotherapy.

Prolotherapy and trigger point therapy are essentially the same technique. Both Prolotherapy and trigger point injections can reduce or eliminate pain and result in the growth of new cells to support weakened ligaments and tendons.

Although generally safe and effective, there are cases where trigger point injection therapy just will not do the trick. Some of the more common reasons include cases involving stress due to psychological factors, chronic infection, skeletal asymmetry, nutritional deficiencies, metabolic problems, allergy, or disease. In many cases involving skeletal misalignment, or myofascial pain Prolotherapy may offer the only effective cure.

“Trigger Points” and “Tender Points”

A normal healthy body contains an intricate framework of bones and cartilage supported in perfect harmony by a network of semi-elastic tissues, mainly tendons and ligaments. Dysfunction in these tissues causes a wide variety of problems.

When the tendons or ligaments, which anchor the structure, are weakened or damaged, the stress and friction created by the misalignment of joints results in chronic pain. Similar stresses can be caused by the action of dysfunctional muscles, tendons, or ligaments containing problem areas known as “trigger points” or “tender points” – hyper-irritable, painful soft tissue areas. Normal healthy soft tissue does not contain trigger or tender points.

The source of muscle pain is called the active trigger point. In some cases, the pain occurs directly in the active trigger point that caused it. This is called a primary trigger point. Pain can also manifest in distant areas away from the active trigger point. Such pain is called referred pain. Cases of referred pain may involve either secondary or satellite trigger points.

A secondary trigger point is a hyperirritable spot in a muscle or fascia that became active because the muscle (in which it manifests) has an antagonistic or a synergistic relationship with the muscle actually triggering the pain. That is, it works with, or against, the muscle which hosts the primary trigger point. A satellite trigger point is simply one that receives pain because it is located in a zone of reference linked directly to the active trigger point, an area known as the essential pain zone. There are also areas known as spillover pain zones that receive pain signals that spill out beyond the normal boundaries of the essential pain zone where it originates.

Besides the pain caused by active trigger points, there are symptoms other than pain that are caused by latent trigger points. Some common latent symptoms include weakness, stiffness or restriction of movement. Both active and latent trigger points cause dysfunction–but only active ones cause pain.

A normal healthy body contains an intricate framework of bones and cartilage supported in perfect harmony by a network of semi-elastic tissues, mainly tendons and ligaments. Dysfunction in these tissues causes a wide variety of problems.

When the tendons or ligaments, which anchor the structure, are weakened or damaged, the stress and friction created by the misalignment of joints results in chronic pain. Similar stresses can be caused by the action of dysfunctional muscles, tendons, or ligaments containing problem areas known as “trigger points” or “tender points”-hyperirritable, painful soft tissue areas. Normal healthy soft tissue does not contain trigger or tender points.

The source of muscle pain is called the active trigger point. In some cases, the pain occurs directly in the active trigger point that caused it. This is called a primary trigger point. Pain can also manifest in distant areas away from the active trigger point. Such pain is called referred pain. Cases of referred pain may involve either secondary or satellite trigger points.

A secondary trigger point is a hyperirritable spot in a muscle or fascia that became active because the muscle (in which it manifests) has an antagonistic or a synergistic relationship with the muscle actually triggering the pain. That is, it works with, or against, the muscle which hosts the primary trigger point. A satellite trigger point is simply one that receives pain because it is located in a zone of reference linked directly to the active trigger point, an area known as the essential pain zone. There are also areas known as spillover pain zones that receive pain signals that spill out beyond the normal boundaries of the essential pain zone where it originates.

Besides the pain caused by active trigger points, there are symptoms other than pain that are caused by latent trigger points. Some common latent symptoms include weakness, stiffness or restriction of movement. Both active and latent trigger points cause dysfunction–but only active ones cause pain.

Myofasciitis is a general term used to describe pain or other dysfunctions in the network of muscles, tendons, and ligaments and other soft connective tissue that holds our bodies together. Myofascial pain may start abruptly or gradually. Abrupt onset is usually the result of trauma to the muscle, such as a sudden overload or over-extension, while a gradual onset is due to chronic overload, virus, or other disease, or psychogenic stress.

Although an understanding of the various symptoms of pain, such as whether it occurs at rest or during activity, what muscles it is related to, whether it is primary or referred, and countless other factors, the doctor can isolate the problem and treat it with trigger point therapy or with Prolotherapy.

Prolotherapy and trigger point therapy are essentially the same technique. Both Prolotherapy and trigger point injections can reduce or eliminate pain and result in the growth of new cells to support weakened ligaments and tendons.

Although generally safe and effective, there are cases where trigger point injection therapy just will not do the trick. Some of the more common reasons include cases involving stress due to psychological factors, chronic infection, skeletal asymmetry, nutritional deficiencies, metabolic problems, allergy, or disease. In many cases involving skeletal misalignment, or myofascial pain Prolotherapy may offer the only effective cure.


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